Regional Policy

State and regional policies have a profound impact on the safety, convenience, and ability of children to be able to walk and bicycle to schools and be more physically active in daily life. Over the past six years, the Safe Routes Partnership has worked in targeted metropolitan areas to advance healthy transportation options at the regional level where the decisions made and resources allocated define what is possible for very large populations.

Through our Regional Network, graciously supported by Kaiser Permanente, we work on the ground in California, the Pacific Northwest, and the Mid-Atlantic region to improve funding for Safe Routes to School and active transportation; advance regional planning, Complete Streets, Vision Zero, and environmental justice; and rally networks of supporters.

CA walking
Statewide and in the San Francisco Bay area, Central Valley, and the greater Los Angeles area, we help ensure that Safe Routes to School funds succeed in California, leverage additional resources, and address and improve regional transportation policies.
MAL bike
Serving Baltimore plus the greater Washington DC region—which includes 8 counties in Maryland and Virginia plus the District of Columbia—we engage partners and influence regional, county and city policies and funding to support safe, healthy active transportation and communities.
PNW walking
Together, around the greater Portland, Vancouver, Salem, and Eugene regions, we support walking and bicycling policies and funding within communities, to create a place where walking and bicycling are safe and convenient.

Regional News

Pacific Northwest
May 20, 2019

SKATS, the designated MPO for the Salem-Keizer region, has released the 2019-2043 Regional Transportation Systems Plan (RTSP) for public review. The RTSP is the long-term guide that identifies priority transportation investments and is only updated every four years.  We’ve submitted comments requesting that the RTSP is strengthened in the following areas:

Pacific Northwest
May 16, 2019

In 2017, the city of Portland received local speed setting authority from the Oregon Legislature to reduce residential speeds from 25 to 20 mph. A rigorous “20 is Plenty” campaign and 2,100 new speed signs later, Portland has made significant strides towards slowing down cars. Meanwhile, other Oregon communities are interested in getting their own speed setting authority, including Eugene which recently adopted a 5-year Vision Zero Action Plan.

Pacific Northwest
May 15, 2019
Read our testimony and letter to Task Force members
Pacific Northwest
April 30, 2019
The WSDOT Active Transportation Plan updates the state's "bicycle facilities and pedestrian walkways plan", and is a way to use what we learn from you and others to shape recommendations for policy decisions, investments, and improvements. The plan will consider where we are now, where we want to go, and how we are going to get there in the coming years. It coordinates with your local and region plans so get involved in those too.
California
April 22, 2019

A number of important plans will be updated in our Central Valley counties in coming months, offering advocates opportunities to weigh in on planning and transportation decisions. General Plans will be updated in Modesto and in Fresno County, and we will be particularly concerned that issues of equity, environmental justice and SB 1000 will be addressed. In addition, the Non-Motorized Transportation Plan in Stanislaus County will be updated, and we look forward to helping align the county’s Safe Routes to School and active transportation efforts where needs are greatest.

California
April 16, 2019

Late last month, State Senator Jim Beall (District 15, Santa Clara) introduced SB 152, which would radically restructure the Active Transportation Program, reducing the statewide component to 10% from its current 50% while increasing the Metropolitan Planning Organization component from 40% to 75% and the Small Urban and Rural component from 10%-15%.