Blog entries tagged with: federal transportation policy

States Get Two New Ways to Avoid Spending Money on Biking and Walking

While Safe Routes to School advocates are all convinced about the grave need for safety improvements around schools to make sure kids and families can be active and safe, not all state Departments of Transportation are on the same page.

Ask Congress to join in Vision Zero

As our new publication Vision Zero and Safe Routes to School: Partners in Safety makes clear, when a community takes a Vision Zero pledge to eliminate all traffic fatalities and serious injuries, there is an opportunity for Safe Routes to School advocates to take their efforts to the next level. Vision Zero action plans can lead to a greater community focus on and funding towards making the streets safer for kids and families.

Consulting the Crystal Ball on Infrastructure

Last night, in his address to Congress, President Trump revisited his campaign promise of a big new investment in infrastructure. He called upon Congress to pass a $1 trillion infrastructure package, using a combination of public and private investment.

USDOT Acknowledges We Should Measure People, Not Just Cars

We have one last victory to report at Secretary Foxx’s US Department of Transportation. USDOT has significantly rewritten their proposed system performance measures after receiving significant pressure from advocates like you. We owe a big thank you to everyone who weighed in and to USDOT for listening. 

USDOT Sets Ambitious Goals for Biking and Walking

In September, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) issued a new Strategic Agenda for Pedestrian and Bicycle Transportation, which will guide their spending and initiatives for the next five years.

Thousands Tell USDOT to Count People Instead of Cars; AASHTO Says Your Opinion Shouldn't Matter

Back in May, we asked you to take action against the US Department of Transportation’s (USDOT) proposed “system performance measures” that would have measured the speed of cars and trucks in seven different ways, while devoting no measures at all to people walking, bicycling, and taking transit.