2016 - Webinar

Health Impact in 5 Years: An In-Depth Look at Safe Routes to School

November 7, 2016

This webinar, part of the CDC's Health Impact in 5 Years initiative, is an excellent opportunity for Safe Routes to School advocates to learn how to pitch Safe Routes to School to health partners.

Health Impact in 5 Years: An In-Depth Look at Safe Routes to School
Monday, November 7 at 3 p.m. ET / 12 p.m. PT
Register here

On November 7, join John Auerbach from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for a webinar on Safe Routes to School as a community-wide intervention with a 5-year impact. This webinar is part of the CDC's new Health Impact in 5 Years (HI-5) initiative. This is an excellent opportunity for Safe Routes to School advocates to learn how to pitch Safe Routes to School to health partners.

The HI-5 (high-five) initiative highlights a list of non-clinical, community-wide approaches with a proven track record. Each intervention listed is associated with improved health within five years and is reported to be cost-effective or cost-saving over the lifetime of the population or even earlier. Public and private organizations can use this list to quickly assess the scientific evidence for short-term health outcomes and overall cost impacts of community-wide approaches.

This webinar will provide stakeholders with the opportunity to hear real-world examples of how local and state-level organizations have implemented Safe Routes to School (SRTS) to meet needs of their communities. In this Web Forum, John Auerbach, CDC Associate Director for Policy, and Elizabeth Skillen, CDC Senior Policy Advisor, will give an overview of the HI-5 initiative. Sara Zimmerman, Program and Policy Director at the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, and Melissa A. Kraemer Badtke, Principal Planner/Safe Routes to School Coordinator at the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, will describe their experiences with SRTS programs, including how SRTS impacted health and costs.

Authored by: 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention