Blog

Traffic Gardens to Teach and Inspire Kids

This guest blog post was written by Tiffany Lam, research adviser.

traffic garden
Some schools are experimenting with traffic gardens like the one pictured above. Photo: Fionnuala Quinn/Bureau of Good Roads

Four Things Healthy Food Advocates Can Do to Improve Access for People Without Cars

“There are too many places in this country where it’s easier to buy a grape soda than a bunch of grapes,” explains Caroline Harries, Associate Director at The Food Trust, when she describes food deserts. Although there are many definitions of food deserts, they are commonly understood as places where fresh, nutritious foods are not accessible within a reasonable or convenient distance to travel. They are often defined as one mile in an urban area and ten miles in a rural area. In a car, those distances are no problem.

Safe Routes to Groceries in Cleveland’s AsiaTown

In winter 2017, our team got a question: “Have you ever looked at how people can walk to and from grocery stores from senior centers? Maybe Safe Routes to Grocery Stores?” We were thrilled. We had been working for the past year to refine a concept called Safe Routes to Healthy Food, which works to overcome the barriers to walking, biking, and taking public transportation to places where people get healthy foods. This was a chance to dive in to see how the challenges and solutions we’d been exploring played out in a real neighborhood. Asian Services in Action, Inc.

Building Parks is Not Enough

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Safe Routes to Parks is a national framework for ensuring that people can walk, bike or roll to a park or greenspace in a way that is appealing and safe from traffic and personal danger. Photo Naim Hasan Photography

Shuster Proposal Sets Stage for Transportation Reauthorization

Earlier this week, Rep. Shuster (R-PA), the current chair of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, released an Infrastructure Discussion Draft. He is hoping it will prompt discussion on how to address the continual shortfall of funding in the Highway Trust Fund.

States Buckle Down on Spending TAP; Some States Risk Losing Funds

Each quarter, we take a look at state progress with implementing the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP). For the quarter covering April to June 2018, states obligated nearly $131 million in TAP funding, with all states except for three making forward progress. (Obligation means that the state DOT has committed funding to a local TAP project and is a key step towards actually getting the project built or implemented.)